The most crucial part of a sermon is to preach Christ. As an aspiring pastor, I want every message I preach to center on Christ, for he is the center of all Scripture. So, it is crucial that he be preached from the pulpit. It isn’t an easy task. It is far easier to say whatever comes to your mind, but then it wouldn’t be preaching if it left out Christ. What makes Christian preaching so vastly different from other religious “preaching” is the exalting of the Lord Jesus Christ.

People need to hear of Christ. They need to hear about his perfect and sinless life. They need to hear about his undeserved suffering. They need to hear of his substitutionary death on the cross for sin. They need to hear of his resurrection. They need to hear about his glorious return to make all things new. People need to hear Christ.

Charles H. Spurgeon said some convicting things concerning this matter of preaching Christ. Here is just one quote that I hope digs into your mind this day and convicts you as well. You may not be an aspiring pastor or a pastor at all! But, if you are a Christian then you need to hear Christ be preached from the pulpit. You need to preach Christ to yourself. You need to preach Christ to others when you share his gospel. It is a great task, but it is a necessary task.

“Leave Christ out of the preaching and you shall do nothing. Only advertise it all over London, Mr. Baker, that you are making bread without flour; put it in every paper, ‘Bread without flour’ and you may soon shut up your shop, for your customers will hurry off to other tradesmen. … A sermon without Christ as its beginning, middle, and end is a mistake in conception and a crime in execution. However grand the language it will be merely much-ado-about-nothing if Christ be not there. And I mean by Christ not merely his example and the ethical precepts of his teaching, but his atoning blood, his wondrous satisfaction made for human sin, and the grand doctrine of ‘believe and live.'”

-Charles Haddon Spurgeon

One thought on “Bread Without Flour

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s